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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 408278, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/408278
Research Article

Development of a Finite Element Head Model for the Study of Impact Head Injury

1College of Automobile and Traffic Engineering, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing 210037, China
2Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576

Received 23 May 2014; Revised 22 August 2014; Accepted 22 August 2014; Published 22 October 2014

Academic Editor: John H. Zhang

Copyright © 2014 Bin Yang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

This study is aimed at developing a high quality, validated finite element (FE) human head model for traumatic brain injuries (TBI) prediction and prevention during vehicle collisions. The geometry of the FE model was based on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of a volunteer close to the anthropometry of a 50th percentile male. The material and structural properties were selected based on a synthesis of current knowledge of the constitutive models for each tissue. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was simulated explicitly as a hydrostatic fluid by using a surface-based fluid modeling method. The model was validated in the loading condition observed in frontal impact vehicle collision. These validations include the intracranial pressure (ICP), brain motion, impact force and intracranial acceleration response, maximum von Mises stress in the brain, and maximum principal stress in the skull. Overall results obtained in the validation indicated improved biofidelity relative to previous FE models, and the change in the maximum von Mises in the brain is mainly caused by the improvement of the CSF simulation. The model may be used for improving the current injury criteria of the brain and anthropometric test devices.