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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 410480, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/410480
Research Article

Primary Genetic Investigation of a Hyperlipidemia Model: Molecular Characteristics and Variants of the Apolipoprotein E Gene in Mongolian Gerbil

1College of Animal Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China
2Zhejiang Academy of Medical Sciences, Hangzhou 310013, China

Received 22 January 2014; Revised 6 May 2014; Accepted 8 May 2014; Published 1 June 2014

Academic Editor: Qinghua Nie

Copyright © 2014 Yuehuan Liu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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