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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 412075, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/412075
Research Article

Ex Vivo Expansion of Functional Human UCB-HSCs/HPCs by Coculture with AFT024-hkirre Cells

1Department of Pathology, University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Lahore 54000, Pakistan
2Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, University of Agriculture, Peshawar 25000, Pakistan
3State Key Laboratory of Biomembrane and Membrane Biotechnology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China
4Department of Anatomy and Histology, University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Lahore 54000, Pakistan
5Department of Advanced Materials & Nanotechnology, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China
6Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Lahore 54000, Pakistan
7Institue of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Lahore 54000, Pakistan

Received 15 April 2013; Revised 30 November 2013; Accepted 16 December 2013; Published 25 February 2014

Academic Editor: Heide Schatten

Copyright © 2014 Muti ur Rehman Khan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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