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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 424652, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/424652
Research Article

The Longitudinal Assessment of Osteomyelitis Development by Molecular Imaging in a Rabbit Model

1Laboratory for Experimental Orthopaedics, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, CAPHRI School for Public Health and Primary Care, Maastricht University Medical Centre, P.O. Box 5800, 6202 AZ Maastricht, The Netherlands
2Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Centre, P.O. Box 5800, 6202 AZ Maastricht, The Netherlands

Received 4 June 2014; Accepted 22 August 2014; Published 11 September 2014

Academic Editor: Andor Glaudemans

Copyright © 2014 Jim C. E. Odekerken et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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