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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 467395, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/467395
Research Article

Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Leaves and Roots in Response to Sudden Increase in Salinity in Brassica napus by RNA-seq

1Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, 1-1 Tsutsumidori Amamiyamachi, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 981-8555, Japan
2Molecular Population Genetics Group, Temasek Lifesciences Laboratory, 1 Research Link, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117604
3ACGT Sdn. Bhd. Lot L3-I-1, Enterprise 4, Technology Park Malaysia, 57000 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
4National Heart Centre Singapore Pte. Ltd., 17 Third Hospital Avenue No. 01-00, Singapore 168752

Received 8 April 2014; Accepted 20 June 2014; Published 7 August 2014

Academic Editor: Limei Qiu

Copyright © 2014 Hui-Yee Yong et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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