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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 468309, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/468309
Review Article

Optimal Management of the Critically Ill: Anaesthesia, Monitoring, Data Capture, and Point-of-Care Technological Practices in Ovine Models of Critical Care

1Critical Care Research Group Laboratory, The Prince Charles Hospital, Rode Road, Chermside, Brisbane, QLD 4032, Australia
2The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australia
3Medical Engineering Research Facility (MERF), Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4001, Australia
4Bond University, Gold Coast, QLD 4226, Australia
5Research and Development, Australian Red Cross Blood Service, Kelvin Grove, Brisbane, QLD 4059, Australia
6Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4001, Australia
7Department of Emergency Medicine, Princess Alexandra Hospital, 199 Ipswich Road, Woolloongabba, QLD 4102, Australia
8Innovative Cardiovascular Engineering and Technology Laboratory, The Prince Charles Hospital, Chermside, Brisbane, QLD 4032, Australia

Received 13 September 2013; Revised 21 January 2014; Accepted 10 February 2014; Published 25 March 2014

Academic Editor: Izumi Takeyoshi

Copyright © 2014 Saul Chemonges et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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