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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 470393, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/470393
Research Article

Pinocembrin Protects Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells against Fibrillar Amyloid- β1−40 Injury by Suppressing the MAPK/NF- κ B Inflammatory Pathways

1Beijing Key Laboratory of Drug Target and Screening Research, Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100050, China
2Pharmacy Department, the Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266003, China

Received 7 April 2014; Revised 2 June 2014; Accepted 15 June 2014; Published 23 July 2014

Academic Editor: Nikunj Patel

Copyright © 2014 Rui Liu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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