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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 472978, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/472978
Review Article

Human Cytomegalovirus and Autoimmune Disease

Institute of Virology, University Medical Center, Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Straße 11, 79104 Freiburg, Germany

Received 27 January 2014; Accepted 17 March 2014; Published 29 April 2014

Academic Editor: Tsai-Ching Hsu

Copyright © 2014 Anne Halenius and Hartmut Hengel. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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