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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 473419, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/473419
Research Article

Complications of Trauma Patients Admitted to the ICU in Level I Academic Trauma Centers in the United States

1Department of Neurosciences, University of Messina, Via Consolare Valeria, 98125 Messina, Italy
2Department of Biostatistics, College of Public Health and Health Professions, College of Medicine, University of Florida, P.O. Box 117450, 2004 Mowry Road, 5th Floor CTRB, Gainesville, FL 32611-7450, USA
3Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Messina, Via Consolare Valeria, 98125 Messina, Italy
4Department of Human Pathology, University of Messina, Via Consolare Valeria, 98125 Messina, Italy
5University of South Florida and Trauma Services, Ocala Regional Medical Center, Ocala, FL, USA

Received 16 February 2014; Revised 22 May 2014; Accepted 22 May 2014; Published 3 June 2014

Academic Editor: Markus Kipp

Copyright © 2014 Stefania Mondello et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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