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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 478965, 20 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/478965
Review Article

Neural Regulation of Cardiovascular Response to Exercise: Role of Central Command and Peripheral Afferents

1Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Fluminense Federal University, Niterói, RJ, Brazil
2Department of Physiology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USA
3Section of Exercise Physiology, Department of Physiology, Federal University of São Paulo, SP, Brazil
4Sports Physiology laboratory Lab., Department of Medical Sciences, University of Cagliari, Italy
5Heart Failure Unit, Cardiac Department, Guglielmo da Saliceto Polichirurgico Hospital, Piacenza, Italy

Received 25 October 2013; Accepted 4 February 2014; Published 9 April 2014

Academic Editor: Abel Romero-Corral

Copyright © 2014 Antonio C. L. Nobrega et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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