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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 479269, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/479269
Research Article

Cell Surface Proteomics Analysis Indicates a Neural Lineage Bias of Rat Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

1The Institute of Genetics, College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China
2Key Laboratory of Aquatic Resources and Utilization, Ministry of Education, College of Fisheries and Life Sciences, Shanghai Ocean University, Shanghai, 201306, China

Received 21 June 2013; Revised 8 December 2013; Accepted 20 December 2013; Published 16 January 2014

Academic Editor: Martin Bornhaeuser

Copyright © 2014 Guiyun Zhao et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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