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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 482396, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/482396
Research Article

A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase 9 Is Involved in Ectodomain Shedding of Receptor-Binding Cancer Antigen Expressed on SiSo Cells

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Maidashi 3-1-1, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582, Japan

Received 16 April 2014; Revised 16 June 2014; Accepted 9 July 2014; Published 7 August 2014

Academic Editor: Dominique Alfandari

Copyright © 2014 Kenzo Sonoda and Kiyoko Kato. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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