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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 495091, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/495091
Review Article

Molecular Chaperone Dysfunction in Neurodegenerative Diseases and Effects of Curcumin

1Department of Neurology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163, USA
2Department of Physiology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163, USA
3Neurobiology-Neurodegeneration and Repair Laboratory, National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
4Veteran’s Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Geriatric Research and Educational Core, Los Angeles, CA 90073, USA
5Departments of Neurology and Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA

Received 6 June 2014; Accepted 23 August 2014; Published 19 October 2014

Academic Editor: Michael Chen

Copyright © 2014 Panchanan Maiti et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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