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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 495754, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/495754
Research Article

Expression Profiles of Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition-Associated Proteins in Epithelial Ovarian Carcinoma

1Biomedical Science Project, Brain Korea 21 Program for Leading Universities & Students, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
2Department of Pathology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
3Department of Pathology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Republic of Korea
4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Republic of Korea
5Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744, Republic of Korea
6Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
7WCU Biomodulation Major, Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea

Received 29 January 2014; Accepted 15 March 2014; Published 1 April 2014

Academic Editor: Benjamin K. Tsang

Copyright © 2014 Mi-Kyung Kim et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been suggested to contribute to tumor progression and acquisition of therapeutic resistance. To assess the clinical significance of EMT-associated proteins, we evaluated the expression of Snail and Slug, the key regulators of EMT, in the primary ovarian cancer samples () by immunohistochemistry. Snail was differentially expressed according to the histologic subtype () and was predominantly expressed in serous and endometrioid types. In the serous and endometrioid adenocarcinomas, the expression of Snail remained high across the stage and grade, suggesting its role in the early phase of carcinogenesis. However, the expression of Snail and Slug was not related to chemoresistance and poor prognosis and did not serve as independent predictive or prognostic marker.