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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 502093, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/502093
Review Article

Role of the Adjacent Stroma Cells in Prostate Cancer Development and Progression: Synergy between TGF-β and IGF Signaling

1Department of Urology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Tarry Building, Room 16-733, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611, USA
2Department of Urology, University of California at Irvine, Medical Center, Orange, CA 92868, USA
3Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of California at Irvine, Medical Surgery Building I, Room 168, Irvine, CA 92697, USA
4Department of Surgery, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, IL 60201, USA
5Department of Statistics, University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325, USA
6Department of Family and Community Medicine, Northeast Ohio Medical University, Rootstown, OH 44272, USA

Received 29 January 2014; Accepted 28 May 2014; Published 25 June 2014

Academic Editor: Leland Chung

Copyright © 2014 Chung Lee et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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