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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 504808, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/504808
Review Article

Roles of Renal Proximal Tubule Transport in Acid/Base Balance and Blood Pressure Regulation

Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan

Received 5 May 2014; Accepted 16 May 2014; Published 28 May 2014

Academic Editor: Yoshinori Marunaka

Copyright © 2014 Motonobu Nakamura et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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