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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 538546, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/538546
Review Article

Nonprofessional Phagocytic Cell Receptors Involved in Staphylococcus aureus Internalization

Centro Multidisciplinario de Estudios en Biotecnología-FMVZ, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Km 9.5 Carretera Morelia-Zinapécuaro, CP 58893 La Palma. MICH, Mexico

Received 7 February 2014; Accepted 21 March 2014; Published 15 April 2014

Academic Editor: Chensong Wan

Copyright © 2014 Nayeli Alva-Murillo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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