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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 541614, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/541614
Research Article

A Participatory Approach to Develop the Power Mobility Screening Tool and the Power Mobility Clinical Driving Assessment Tool

1VA Center of Excellence in Wheelchairs and Related Technology, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System and Human Engineering Research Laboratories, Pittsburgh, PA 15206, USA
2Human Engineering Research Laboratories, 6425 Penn Avenue, Bakery Square, Suite 400, Pittsburgh, PA 15206, USA
3Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA
4Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA

Received 11 April 2014; Revised 28 July 2014; Accepted 5 August 2014; Published 8 September 2014

Academic Editor: Sonja de Groot

Copyright © 2014 Deepan C. Kamaraj et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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