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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 541847, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/541847
Clinical Study

Image Guided Hypofractionated Radiotherapy by Helical Tomotherapy for Prostate Carcinoma: Toxicity and Impact on Nadir PSA

1Department of Radiation Oncology, IRCCS San Martino-IST, National Cancer Research Institute, 16100 Genoa, Italy
2University of Genoa, DISSAL, 16100 Genoa, Italy
3Department of Medical Physics, IRCCS San Martino-IST, National Cancer Research Institute, Genova, Italy

Received 18 January 2014; Accepted 13 February 2014; Published 18 March 2014

Academic Editor: Giovanni Luca Gravina

Copyright © 2014 Salvina Barra et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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