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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 581403, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/581403
Research Article

Epigenetic Silencing of CXCR4 Promotes Loss of Cell Adhesion in Cervical Cancer

1Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005, India
2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005, India
3Department of Zoology, Mahila Mahavidyalaya, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005, India
4Department of Radiotherapy & Radiation Medicine, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005, India

Received 24 February 2014; Revised 31 May 2014; Accepted 31 May 2014; Published 10 July 2014

Academic Editor: Jozef Zustin

Copyright © 2014 Suresh Singh Yadav et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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