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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 613730, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/613730
Research Article

Phenotypic Characterization of Mycoplasma synoviae Induced Changes in the Metabolic and Sensitivity Profile of In Vitro Infected Chicken Chondrocytes

Department of Animal Science, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Groblje 3, 1230 Domzale, Slovenia

Received 19 March 2014; Revised 9 August 2014; Accepted 10 August 2014; Published 26 August 2014

Academic Editor: Sergio Lavandero

Copyright © 2014 Daliborka Dušanić et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

In infectious synovitis caused by Mycoplasma synoviae chicken chondrocytes (CCH) may come into direct contact with these bacteria that are also capable of invading CCH in vitro. In this study, phenotype microarrays were used to evaluate the influence of Mycoplasma synoviae on the global metabolic activity of CCH. Therefore, CCH were cultured in the presence of 504 individual compounds, spotted in wells of 11 phenotype microarrays for eukaryotic cells, and exposed to Mycoplasma synoviae membranes or viable Mycoplasma synoviae. Metabolic activity and sensitivity of normal cells versus infected cells were evaluated. Metabolic profiles of CCH treated with viable Mycoplasma synoviae or its membranes were significantly different from those of CCH alone. CCH treated with Mycoplasma synoviae membranes were able to use 48 carbon/nitrogen sources not used by CCH alone. Treatment also influenced ion uptake in CCH and intensified the sensitivity to 13 hormones, 5 immune mediators, and 29 cytotoxic chemicals. CCH were even more sensitive to hormones/immune mediators when exposed to viable Mycoplasma synoviae. Our results indicate that exposure to Mycoplasma synoviae or its membranes induces a wide range of metabolic and sensitivity modifications in CCH that can contribute to pathological processes in the development of infectious synovitis.