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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 613890, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/613890
Review Article

Creatine, L-Carnitine, and ω3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Supplementation from Healthy to Diseased Skeletal Muscle

1Department of Molecular Medicine and Laboratory for Motor Activities in Rare Diseases (LUSAMMR), University of Pavia, Via Forlanini 6, 27100 Pavia, Italy
2Applied Biotechnology Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 19395-5487, Tehran, Iran
3Department of Experimental and Forensic Medicine, University of Pavia, Via Forlanini 2, 27100 Pavia, Italy
4Department of Drug Sciences, Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Technology Section, University of Pavia, Via Taramelli 12, 27100 Pavia, Italy
5Maugeri Foundation IRCCS, Montescano Scientific Institute, Via Per Montescano 31, 27040 Montescano, Italy
6Center for Study and Research on Obesity, Department of Medical Biotechnology and Translational Medicine, University of Milan, Via Vanvitelli 32, 20129 Milan, Italy
7Human Nutrition Section, Health Sciences Department, University of Pavia, Azienda di Servizi alla Persona, Via Emilia 12, 27100 Pavia, Italy

Received 24 April 2014; Revised 19 July 2014; Accepted 6 August 2014; Published 28 August 2014

Academic Editor: Robert W. Grange

Copyright © 2014 Giuseppe D’Antona et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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