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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 630160, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/630160
Research Article

Canine Filarial Infections in a Human Brugia malayi Endemic Area of India

1Department of Veterinary Parasitology, College of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Pookode, Wayanad, Kerala 673576, India
2Department of Veterinary Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Pookode, Wayanad, Kerala 673 576, India
3Department of Animal Husbandry, Kerala 695 033, India
4Department of Veterinary Anatomy, College of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Pookode, Wayanad, Kerala 673 576, India
5National Centre for Diseases Control, Kerala 673 003, India

Received 17 February 2014; Accepted 22 April 2014; Published 20 May 2014

Academic Editor: Fabio Ribeiro Braga

Copyright © 2014 Reghu Ravindran et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

A very high prevalence of microfilaremia of 42.68 per cent out of 164 canine blood samples examined was observed in Cherthala (of Alappuzha district of Kerala state), a known human Brugia malayi endemic area of south India. The species of canine microfilariae were identified as Dirofilaria repens, Brugia malayi, and Acanthocheilonema reconditum. D. repens was the most commonly detected species followed by B. pahangi. D. immitis was not detected in any of the samples examined. Based on molecular techniques, microfilariae with histochemical staining pattern of “local staining at anal pore and diffuse staining at central body” was identified as D. repens in addition to those showing acid phosphatase activity only at the anal pore. Even though B. malayi like acid phosphatase activity was observed in few dogs examined, they were identified as genetically closer to B. pahangi. Hence, the possibility of dogs acting as reservoirs of human B. malayi in this area was ruled out.