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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 635979, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/635979
Review Article

The Dynamic of the Apical Ectoplasmic Specialization between Spermatids and Sertoli Cells: The Case of the Small GTPase Rap1

Department of Biosciences, University of Milan, 20133 Milano, Italy

Received 12 December 2013; Accepted 19 January 2014; Published 27 February 2014

Academic Editor: Nicola Bernabò

Copyright © 2014 Giovanna Berruti and Chiara Paiardi. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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