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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 636574, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/636574
Research Article

Long-Term Effects of Maternal Deprivation on Cholinergic System in Rat Brain

1Faculty of Sport and Physical Education, University of Belgrade, Blagoja Parovića 156, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia
2Institute of Clinical and Medical Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Pasterova 2, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia
3Institute of Anatomy “Niko Miljanić”, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotića 4, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia

Received 8 December 2013; Revised 27 January 2014; Accepted 28 January 2014; Published 10 March 2014

Academic Editor: Igor Jakovcevski

Copyright © 2014 Branka Marković et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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