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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 640754, 26 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/640754
Review Article

Biomedical Implications of Heavy Metals Induced Imbalances in Redox Systems

1Department of Biochemistry, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002, India
2Department of Genetics, SGPGIMS, Lucknow 226014, India
3Department of Biochemistry, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia

Received 28 February 2014; Revised 28 May 2014; Accepted 10 July 2014; Published 12 August 2014

Academic Editor: Hartmut Jaeschke

Copyright © 2014 Bechan Sharma et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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