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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 643805, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/643805
Review Article

Role of Noncoding RNAs in the Regulation of P-TEFb Availability and Enzymatic Activity

1Department of Biology, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy
2Department of Molecular Medicine and Medical Biotechnologies, University of Naples Federico II, Italy

Received 18 October 2013; Accepted 13 January 2014; Published 19 February 2014

Academic Editor: Jasper H. N. Yik

Copyright © 2014 Giuliana Napolitano et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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