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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 648137, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/648137
Review Article

Analyzing Association of the XRCC3 Gene Polymorphism with Ovarian Cancer Risk

1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250012, China
2Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Microbiological Engineering, Qilu University of Technology, Jinan, Shandong 250000, China

Received 11 October 2013; Revised 25 April 2014; Accepted 20 May 2014; Published 10 June 2014

Academic Editor: Danny N. Dhanasekaran

Copyright © 2014 Cunzhong Yuan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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