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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 650939, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/650939
Clinical Study

Differentiation of Benign Angiomatous and Microcystic Meningiomas with Extensive Peritumoral Edema from High Grade Meningiomas with Aid of Diffusion Weighted MRI

1Department of Radiology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA
2Department of Neurosurgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA
3Biostatistics Research Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA
4Department of Pathology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA

Received 10 January 2014; Revised 29 April 2014; Accepted 16 June 2014; Published 16 November 2014

Academic Editor: Valeria Barresi

Copyright © 2014 Avetis Azizyan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective. To determine whether angiomatous and microcystic meningiomas which mimic high grade meningiomas based on extent of peritumoral edema can be reliably differentiated as low grade tumors using normalized apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. Methods. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of seventy patients with meningiomas was reviewed. Morphologically, the tumors were divided into 3 groups. Group 1 contained 12 pure microcystic, 3 pure angiomatoid and 7 mixed angiomatoid and microcystic tumors. Group 2 included World Health Organization (WHO) grade II and WHO grade III tumors, of which 28 were atypical and 9 were anaplastic meningiomas. Group 3 included WHO grade I tumors of morphology different than angiomatoid and microcystic. Peritumoral edema, normalized ADC, and cerebral blood volume (CBV) were obtained for all meningiomas. Results. Edema index of tumors in group 1 and group 2 was significantly higher than in group 3. Normalized ADC value in group 1 was higher than in group 2, but not statistically significant between groups 1 and 3. CBV values showed no significant group differences. Conclusion. A combination of peritumoral edema index and normalized ADC value is a novel approach to preoperative differentiation between true aggressive meningiomas and mimickers such as angiomatous and microcystic meningiomas.