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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 654710, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/654710
Research Article

Regulation of Melanopsins and Per1 by α-MSH and Melatonin in Photosensitive Xenopus laevis Melanophores

1Department of Physiology, Institute of Biosciences, University of São Paulo, R. do Matão, Travessera 14, No. 101, 05508-900 São Paulo, SP, Brazil
2Department of Physiology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Minas Gerais, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil

Received 26 January 2014; Revised 27 March 2014; Accepted 30 March 2014; Published 13 May 2014

Academic Editor: Mario Guido

Copyright © 2014 Maria Nathália de Carvalho Magalhães Moraes et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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