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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 658056, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/658056
Research Article

An Investigation of the Significance of Residual Confounding Effect

1National Drug Research Institute, Curtin University, G.P.O. Box U 1987, Perth, WA 6845, Australia
2Northern Territory Department of Health, Darwin, NT 0800, Australia
3School of Public Health, Curtin University, Perth, WA 6845, Australia

Received 18 December 2013; Accepted 10 January 2014; Published 17 February 2014

Academic Editor: Tanya Chikritzhs

Copyright © 2014 Wenbin Liang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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