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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 673165, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/673165
Research Article

Sex Differences of Uncinate Fasciculus Structural Connectivity in Individuals with Conduct Disorder

1Shanghai Key Laboratory of Forensic Medicine, Institute of Forensic Science, Ministry of Justice, No. 1347 West Guangfu Road, Shanghai 200063, China
2Medical Psychological Institute, The Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, No. 139 Middle Renmin Road, Changsha, Hunan 410011, China
3Department of Medicine, LKS Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, No. 102 Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong
4Centre of Buddhists Studies, The University of Hong Kong, No. 102 Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong
5Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Shenzhen University, No. 3688, Nanhai Ave, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518060, China

Received 27 November 2013; Revised 17 February 2014; Accepted 24 March 2014; Published 14 April 2014

Academic Editor: Marta García-Fiñana

Copyright © 2014 Jibiao Zhang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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