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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 683025, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/683025
Review Article

Role of ROBO4 Signalling in Developmental and Pathological Angiogenesis

Cancer Genetics Laboratory, Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005, India

Received 25 April 2013; Revised 29 November 2013; Accepted 12 December 2013; Published 6 February 2014

Academic Editor: Manoor Prakash Hande

Copyright © 2014 Suresh Singh Yadav and Gopeshwar Narayan. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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