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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 697923, 21 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/697923
Review Article

Aptamers as Both Drugs and Drug-Carriers

Department of Biochemistry, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia

Received 16 December 2013; Revised 4 August 2014; Accepted 22 August 2014; Published 11 September 2014

Academic Editor: Christine Dufès

Copyright © 2014 Md. Ashrafuzzaman. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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