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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 698609, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/698609
Research Article

Human Endogenous Retrovirus W Activity in Cartilage of Osteoarthritis Patients

1Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of North Norway, Sykehusveien 38, 9038 Tromsø, Norway
2Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, MH-Building, 9037 Tromsø, Norway
3Genøk Centre of Biosafety, Science Park, Sykehusveien 23, 9294 Tromsø, Norway
4Department of Orthopaedics, University Hospital of North Norway, Sykehusveien 38, 3098 Tromsø, Norway
5Department of Electron Microscopy, Institute of Medical Biology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, Sykehusveien 44, 9037 Tromsø, Norway
6Department of Medical Biology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, MH-Building, 9037 Tromsø, Norway

Received 7 March 2014; Accepted 25 June 2014; Published 22 July 2014

Academic Editor: Anca Irinel Catrina

Copyright © 2014 Signy Bendiksen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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