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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 736385, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/736385
Review Article

Neurotoxicants Are in the Air: Convergence of Human, Animal, and In Vitro Studies on the Effects of Air Pollution on the Brain

1Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, 4225 Roosevelt, Suite No. 100, Seattle, WA 98105, USA
2Department of Neuroscience, University of Parma, Via Volturno 39, 43100 Parma, Italy
3Center on Human Development and Disability, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA

Received 6 November 2013; Revised 23 December 2013; Accepted 24 December 2013; Published 12 January 2014

Academic Editor: Ambuja Bale

Copyright © 2014 Lucio G. Costa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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