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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 741024, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/741024
Research Article

High Guanidinium Permeability Reveals Dehydration-Dependent Ion Selectivity in the Plasmodial Surface Anion Channel

The Laboratory of Malaria and Vector Research, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD 20852, USA

Received 22 May 2014; Revised 19 July 2014; Accepted 23 July 2014; Published 27 August 2014

Academic Editor: Yoshinori Marunaka

Copyright © 2014 Abdullah A. B. Bokhari et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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