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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 746192, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/746192
Research Article

Renal Transplantation in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Outcome and Prognostic Factors in 50 Cases from a Single Centre

1Department of Autoimmune Diseases, Hospital Clínic, Villarroel 170, 08036 Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain
2Unidad de Enfermedades Autoinmunes Sistémicas, Clínica Médica “C”, Hospital de Clínicas, Universidad de la República, Montevideo, Uruguay
3Department of Nephrology and Renal Transplantation, Hospital Clínic, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain
4Department of Immunology, Hospital Clínic, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain

Received 17 March 2014; Revised 12 May 2014; Accepted 21 May 2014; Published 11 June 2014

Academic Editor: Juan-Manuel Anaya

Copyright © 2014 Ernesto Cairoli et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Objectives. To analyze the outcome and prognostic factors of renal transplantation in patients with ESRD due to SLE from January 1986 to December 2013 in a single center. Results. Fifty renal transplantations were performed in 40 SLE patients (32 female (80%), mean age at transplantation 36 ± 10.4 years). The most frequent lupus nephropathy was type IV (72.2%). Graft failure occurred in a total of 15 (30%) transplantations and the causes of graft failure were chronic allograft nephropathy (), acute rejection (), and chronic humoral rejection (1). The death-censored graft survival rates were 93.9% at 1 year, 81.5% at 5 years, and 67.6% at the end of study. The presence of deceased donor allograft () and positive anti-HCV antibodies () negatively influence the survival of the renal transplant. The patient survival rate was 91.4% at the end of the study. Recurrence of lupus nephritis in renal allograft was observed in one patient. Conclusion. Renal transplantation is a good alternative for renal replacement therapy in patients with SLE. In our cohort, the presence of anti-HCV antibodies and the type of donor source were related to the development of graft failure.