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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 783459, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/783459
Research Article

SIRT1 Inhibition Affects Angiogenic Properties of Human MSCs

1Department of Biochemistry, Biophysics and General Pathology, Second University of Napoli, Via L. De Crecchio 7, 80138 Napoli, Italy
2Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Struttura Complessa Oncologia Medica Melanoma Immunoterapia Oncologica e Terapia Innovativa, Via Mariano Semmola, 80131 Napoli, Italy
3Institute of Genetics and Biophysics “A. Buzzati-Traverso”, CNR, Via P. Castellino 111, 80131 Napoli, Italy

Received 18 July 2014; Revised 7 August 2014; Accepted 8 August 2014; Published 27 August 2014

Academic Editor: Zongjin Li

Copyright © 2014 Botti Chiara et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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