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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 808307, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/808307
Review Article

We Are Ageing

Cardiology Department, Onassis Cardiac Surgery Center, 356 Sygrou Avenue, 17674 Athens, Greece

Received 11 May 2014; Revised 27 May 2014; Accepted 27 May 2014; Published 22 June 2014

Academic Editor: Elísio Costa

Copyright © 2014 Genovefa D. Kolovou et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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