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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 831841, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/831841
Review Article

Biology of Ageing and Role of Dietary Antioxidants

1Food & Nutritional Sciences Programme, School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong
2Lipids Technology and Engineering, College of Food Science and Technology, Henan University of Technology, Henan, China
3Department of Food Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou, China
4School of Biomedical Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong

Received 19 December 2013; Revised 12 February 2014; Accepted 24 February 2014; Published 3 April 2014

Academic Editor: Dina Bellizzi

Copyright © 2014 Cheng Peng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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