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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 848570, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/848570
Research Article

Inhibition of Hydrogen Sulfide Production by Gene Silencing Attenuates Inflammatory Activity by Downregulation of NF-κB and MAP Kinase Activity in LPS-Activated RAW 264.7 Cells

Department of Pathology, University of Otago-Christchurch, P.O. Box 4345, Christchurch 8140, New Zealand

Received 20 February 2014; Revised 8 July 2014; Accepted 24 July 2014; Published 19 August 2014

Academic Editor: Izumi Takeyoshi

Copyright © 2014 Alireza Badiei et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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