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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 852352, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/852352
Research Article

The Effect of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide with iRGD Peptide on the Labeling of Pancreatic Cancer Cells In Vitro: A Preliminary Study

1Sichuan Key Laboratory of Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong, Sichuan 637000, China
2Department of Radiology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People’s Hospital, 600 Yishan Road, Shanghai 200233, China

Received 10 February 2014; Revised 29 April 2014; Accepted 4 May 2014; Published 19 May 2014

Academic Editor: Yi-Xiang Wang

Copyright © 2014 Hou Dong Zuo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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