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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 902315, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/902315
Review Article

A Molecular View of Autophagy in Lepidoptera

Department of Biotechnology and Life Sciences, University of Insubria, Via J. H. Dunant 3, 21100 Varese, Italy

Received 24 January 2014; Revised 6 June 2014; Accepted 20 June 2014; Published 16 July 2014

Academic Editor: Gábor Juhász

Copyright © 2014 Davide Romanelli et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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