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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 913696, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/913696
Review Article

Helminth Parasites Alter Protection against Plasmodium Infection

1Unidad de Biomedicina, Facultad de Estudios Superiores-Iztacala, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Avenida de los Barrios No. 1, Los Reyes Iztacala, 54090 Tlalnepantla, MEX, Mexico
2Laboratorio de Inmunología Molecular, Facultad de Estudios Superiores Zaragoza, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Batalla 5 de Mayo esquina Fuerte de Loreto, 09230 Iztapalapa, DF, Mexico

Received 6 June 2014; Accepted 6 August 2014; Published 8 September 2014

Academic Editor: Abraham Landa-Piedra

Copyright © 2014 Víctor H. Salazar-Castañon et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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