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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 915026, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/915026
Clinical Study

Hypothalamus-Anchored Resting Brain Network Changes before and after Sertraline Treatment in Major Depression

1The Affiliated Xi’an Central Hospital of Medical College of Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710003, China
2Key Laboratory of Environment and Gene Related Diseases, Ministry of Education, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710061, China
3Xi’an Central Hospital, Xi’an 710003, China
4Key Laboratory of Health Ministry for Forensic Science, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710061, China

Received 26 January 2014; Revised 12 February 2014; Accepted 13 February 2014; Published 20 March 2014

Academic Editor: Lijun Bai

Copyright © 2014 Rui Yang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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