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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 918183, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/918183
Review Article

The E3 Ligase CHIP: Insights into Its Structure and Regulation

Cancer Biology and Inflammatory Disorder Division, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research-Indian Institute of Chemical Biology (CSIR-IICB), 4 Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Kolkata 700032, India

Received 7 February 2014; Accepted 7 April 2014; Published 24 April 2014

Academic Editor: Hiroyuki Tomiyama

Copyright © 2014 Indranil Paul and Mrinal K. Ghosh. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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