Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 920902, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/920902
Research Article

Selective Changes of Resting-State Brain Oscillations in aMCI: An fMRI Study Using ALFF

1Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053, China
2Beijing Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Brain Informatics, Beijing 100053, China
3Department of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053, China

Received 28 January 2014; Accepted 11 March 2014; Published 14 April 2014

Academic Editor: Lijun Bai

Copyright © 2014 Zhilian Zhao et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) refers to a transitional state between normal aging and dementia and is a syndrome with cognitive decline greater than expected for an individual’s age and educational level. As a subtype of MCI, amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) most often leads to Alzheimer’s disease. This study aims to elucidate the altered brain activation in patients with aMCI using resting-state functional magnetic resonance. We observed Frequency-dependent changes in the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in aMCI patients (), and normal subjects (). At the same time, we took gray matter volume as a covariate. We found that aMCI patients had decreased amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation signal in left superior temporal gyrus, right middle temporal gyrus, right inferior parietal lobe, and right postcentral gyrus compared to the control group. Specially, aMCI patients showed increased signal in left superior and middle frontal gyrus. Our results suggested that increased activation in frontal lobe of aMCI patients may indicate effective recruitment of compensatory brain resources. This finding and interpretation may lead to the better understanding of cognitive changes of aMCI.