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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 925762, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/925762
Research Article

Gradually Increased Training Intensity Benefits Rehabilitation Outcome after Stroke by BDNF Upregulation and Stress Suppression

1Interdisciplinary Division of Biomedical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong
2Department of Health Technology and Informatics, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong
3College of Biomedical Engineering and Instrument Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, China

Received 28 February 2014; Revised 14 May 2014; Accepted 21 May 2014; Published 19 June 2014

Academic Editor: Yiwen Wang

Copyright © 2014 Jing Sun et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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