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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 949785, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/949785
Clinical Study

Percutaneous Extraction of Transvenous Permanent Pacemaker/Defibrillator Leads

1First Department of Cardiology, AHEPA University Hospital, Aristotle University Medical School, 1 St. Kyriakidi Street, 54636 Thessaloniki, Greece
2Third Department of Cardiology, Hippokrateion University Hospital, Aristotle University Medical School, Thessaloniki, Greece
3Department of Cardiology, Electrophysiology Unit, Royal Brompton Hospital, London, UK

Received 8 February 2014; Revised 1 May 2014; Accepted 1 May 2014; Published 26 May 2014

Academic Editor: James Kirkpatrick

Copyright © 2014 Stylianos Paraskevaidis et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Widespread use of cardiovascular implantable electronic devices has inevitably increased the need for lead revision/replacement. We report our experience in percutaneous extraction of transvenous permanent pacemaker/defibrillator leads. Methods. Thirty-six patients admitted to our centre from September 2005 through October 2012 for percutaneous lead extraction were included. Lead removal was attempted using Spectranetics traction-type system (Spectranetics Corp., Colorado, CO, USA) and VascoExtor countertraction-type system (Vascomed GmbH, Weil am Rhein, Germany). Results. Lead extraction was attempted in 59 leads from 36 patients (27 men), mean ± SD age years, with permanent pacemaker , defibrillator , or cardiac resynchronisation therapy with a mean ± SD implant duration of months. The indications for lead removal included pocket infection , endocarditis , and ventricular and atrial lead dysfunction . Traction device was used for 33 leads and countertraction device for 26 leads. Mean ± SD fluoroscopy time was minutes/lead for leads implanted <48 months and minutes/lead for leads implanted >48 months , . Complete procedural success rate was 91.7% and clinical procedural success rate was 100%, while lead procedural success rate was 95%. Conclusions. In conclusion, percutaneous extraction of transvenous permanent pacemaker/defibrillator leads using dedicated removal tools is both feasible and safe.